hate cucumber

Some People Hate Cucumber

Reading Time 2 minutes

This may come as a surprise to you, some people actually hate Cucumber.

But, do you know why?

Why Hate Cucumber?

Over the years of trying to encourage poeple to adapt Cucumber, here is a list of the most common ‘reasons’ that I have had in response:

It’s An Overhead

When asking colleges to adopt Cucumber as a tool to help remedy the bridge between BA’s and Developers, “Cucumber is an overhead” was the response I got back.

The first time I came across this response, I was a little confused.

How is Cucumber an overhead?

Overtime I figured out that this was simply a reason not to write scripts and directly write code. For a developer, it is usually enough that the requirements are captured in a task tracking board. Having to write feature files which then call code can seem a little ‘middle man’ redundant.

It makes more sense to write small, quick tests and run them in CI. It can become an overhead to write feature files which call code to run tests.

It’s Not A Testing Framework

Cucumber is not a testing framework, I can write a post on this one statement alone.

In short, Cucumber is certainly not a testing framework. It is a framework which can be used to supplement testing, it is not purpose built for testing. When asking a developer to use a framework for testing, they would expect a testing framework. Cucumber in this instance is not.

At the point of hearing this response, I do wonder the justification of the statement. It does make sense to focus on testing frameworks for testing problems. On the other hand, Cucumber can be used to enhance any framework for testing. It can help to implement BDD, clean reporting and bridge any technical gaps between client and hosts.

Bad Memories

Well, this is an interesting one!

How do you convince someone that a technology, when used correctly, is a good idea. And how do you convince that same person when their past experience with the same technology has not been very good (credit to the previous person who tried to introduce it).

Sadly, I have had the ‘pleasure’ of talking to developers who have had a bad experience with Cucumber in the past. This effectively implanted a negative picture of the software. Luckily, given there is an open mind, it can be easy enough to re-implement or re-try the application. Perhaps turn around the ‘hate Cucumber’ thinking. Alternatively, good luck.

So, What Now?

Well, if your passionate about Cucumber and really want to introduce it into your work place, don’t force it. Never try to force the notion. Instead, try to spike a small project and then demo it. You never know, you may convert someone.

Mo

I am a passionate tester, father, husband and gamer. I love to write blogs about Software Testing and generally contribute back to the Software Testing world.

More Posts - Twitter - Facebook

Published by

Mo

I am a passionate tester, father, husband and gamer. I love to write blogs about Software Testing and generally contribute back to the Software Testing world.

Leave a Reply